How Do I Punish My Students? Umm, I Try Not To

When I moved my blog from Blogger to WordPress last summer I mistakenly assumed that all posts would seamlessly transfer.  I have since found the error in my thinking and have decided to re-post some of my more discussed posts that didn’t survive the move.  This is one of those posts.

Recently a comment on my post “If We Would Just Stop Talking, We Might Learn Something” has made me think quite a bit.  Short and simple, it asked, “Do you have your non-punishment strategies written down?  Could you please share it?”  And I went hmmm, non-punishment strategies sounds much more fancy than what I have.  The truth is, I don’t have any strategies; I simply do not punish kids.  In fact, even the word punish is such a heavily loaded word that I cringe at the sound of it.  It brings to mind canning or  publicly embarrassing children, simply not my thing.  So instead I handle situations as they arise, mostly with common sense.  Let me explain by taking some every day situations in a classroom…

  • A student keeps blurting out.  Sense of humor works for me here most of the time and I tend to look at it through a positive lens; wow, that kid can’t wait to share the answer because they are having so much fun!  Strategies used to curb or direct it has been to give them dry-erase boards to write down their answers and then flash them to me or have them tell it to a partner.  If the blurting is more like an epidemic I place a blank post-it on their desk and have them make a tally every time they blurt out.  This is used for self-awareness not as a way to reward or punish and I have seen it help kids realize the extent of their blurting who were otherwise unaware.
  • Homework is not handed in.  Even in a classroom where I try to stay homework-free, some students do not use their time as effectively as others and may have a page or two to do at the end of the day, mostly math.  So the first thing we speak about is time management; what could they be doing differently in class to curtail taking work home?  Then we also discuss taking responsibility for not having their work; if a child tells me in the morning that they did not do their homework and have a strategy for getting it done such as bringing it tomorrow or spending some time during recess, then I am fine with that plan.  The point to the conversation is; I don’t want to be the one that has to come up with the plan or have to find out that they didn’t do their work.  They need to come to me, take responsibility for it and then fix it.  Just like we do as adults.
  • And yet, the homework continues to not get done.  This does not happen a lot in my room because we just don’t have the homework.  And yet it does happen once in a blue moon. Besides a conversation with the student where we discuss things they have tried to fix it, we often do a quick phone call home to discuss strategy with parents.  This is not a punishing phone call but instead a “heads-up” we need to give a little more support here both at school and from home because the work is disappearing.  Often I find the root of this to be disorganization rather than laziness, so my number one point is; ask what happened!
  • Students goof off and generally not paying attention.  This is a huge flashing sign to me that what I am doing is not engaging and that the kids need a break.  So unless I for some extreme reason cannot stop what I am doing, I do just that; stop and switch gears.  Whether it just entails giving them a body break or asking them how they would like to learn about this concept something needs to change.  I have also had them do partner share, journaling, or whatever pops into my head to make sure they stay engaged.  Sometimes a lesson is continued but in a different format, sometimes we scrap it for the day.
  • Students are staring into space, reading a book or doing other work.  For anyone who has ever been absorbed in a great book, we know how hard it is to stop reading, so I always smile a little when I see a student reading under the table.  And yet, students do need to be doing whatever it is we are doing at the moment.  Often a quick tap on the shoulder or even just silence and waiting for them to join the rest of us works.  It is not a big deal, nor do I make it into one.

Yes, I have had students throw chairs and tables in my room, yes I have had students hit each other, and yes, I have had to send students to the office because they needed a cool down moment.  And still, even during those more extreme situations, I always try to keep in mind that there is a cause to this behavior and it is my job to figure it out.  So I do not punish my students.  I do not take away their privileges to coerce them to behave.  I do not threaten, I do not dangle things in front of their nose.  Instead I start out the year by inviting them to create the rules of the classroom and then asking them to responsibility for it.  We help each other out, we steer each other as we do, and we take the time to talk.

So although I may claim to not have any strategies, the one I might have is to listen with not just my ear,s but also my eyes.  Listen to what their behavior tells me, listen to what they tell me, and then listen to my own reflection on how to create better situations.  And that’s how I don’t punish my students.

13 thoughts on “How Do I Punish My Students? Umm, I Try Not To

  1. I keep trying Not to punish…but I find 2nd graders still need limits put on them because they’re not yet able to control their impulses or take full responsibility…or can they? Have you any experience with younger students?

  2. Pingback: Reflection #7: Blogging Through the Fourth Dimension – How Do I Punish My Students? Umm, I Try Not To | Dana Hilton

  3. I work with at-risk kids in an alternative Ed setting and this kind of s-t relationship is essential. While working with kids that don’t respond to yelling or punishing, you must find other ways to work with them when times get tough. I look at more like treating ththe students like human beings. Who when they make a mistake need to be redirected , with patience and kindness. I don’t know any other way. So I want to applaud your effects for making the classroom a safer place for kids to be.

  4. Pingback: Reflection #6: Blogging Through the Fourth Dimension – How Do I Punish My Students? Umm, I Try Not To | Andrew Scherer

  5. What a terrific post. I was nodding my head at your responses to the scenarios. Especially here: “Students goof off and generally not paying attention. This is a huge flashing sign to me that what I am doing is not engaging and that the kids need a break.” I work hard to know my students — I know that when they are squirmy or talkative, they need a stretch or dance break or I need to switch things up to get their attention again. You are doing wonderful things, Pernille! Keep it up!

  6. Pingback: Carey Jacquinot | Reflection #8: How Do I Punish My Students? Umm, I Try Not To

  7. Pingback: How Do I Punish My Students? Umm, I Try Not To...

  8. Pingback: Reflection #15: Blogging Through the Fourth Dimension – How do I punish my students? Umm, I try not to | Dana Hilton

  9. I love this! Most I already do in a Kinder Readiness program I teach. You have given me some good information and ideas. Thank you!

  10. I forgot to say….when problems do arise, I think of it as a “teaching moment” this puts a whole new spin on everything! 😉

  11. Pingback: Gestion du comportement | Pearltrees

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