My Kidblog Settings for Optimal Global Collaboration

When I moved this blog to WordPress some posts did not survive, so in an effort to move some of my favorite posts with me, I will be republishing them here.  

Those who have followed this blog for a while or have found it because you are searching for student blogging resources, know how deeply passionate I am about student blogging and global collaboration.  I am therefore often asked what my settings are for Kidblog and for my students’ use of the site so I thought I would share these.  I have found these settings to offer the safety needed for my students while still allowing them and the world to have a dialogue.

Posts Settings:

 

I find it incredibly important that anyone can read our posts and so far my school district has agreed.  I do, however, give parents a way to opt their students out of blogging if they do not feel comfortable with their child doing it since it is so public.  However, no student has ever been opted out.  Safety is my main concern, as well as how these students represent themselves, so I do moderate all posts before they are published.  I do not get an email but simply check every day.  My students blog too much for me to be notified each time one of them writes a new post.

Comments Settings:

Again, we do  not have password to leave comments on our site nor do you have to be an approved member.  We blog to start conversations with others around the world and as long as I am moderating all comments, I feel we can do it safely.  Every once in a while do I need to delete a comment before a student sees it but mostly because it is a spam one or a duplicate one.  In the four years I have blogged with students, I think we have had 2 insensitive comments left.  I deleted them – no harm done.

 

Finally, Student Settings:

 

 This is where Kidblog keeps proving its brilliance and relevance; this year they added that students could edit their own profiles, thus customizing it to fit their needs.  This has been a huge hit for my students because they feel more in control of their blog and the image they are presenting to the world.  I also like that they can change their password since this is an important computer skill for them to be aware of.  I can still access all of their accounts without knowing their password.

So there you have it, our settings for our classroom student blog, I hope it was helpful, as always if you have any questions please don’t hesitate to ask.  And no, I am not a paid spokesperson for Kidblog; I just love their blogging platform.
I am a passionate  teacher in Wisconsin, USA,  who has taught 4, 5th, and 7th grade.  Proud techy geek, and mass consumer of incredible books. Creator of the Global Read Aloud Project, Co-founder of EdCamp MadWI, and believer in all children. I have no awards or accolades except for the lightbulbs that go off in my students’ heads every day.  First book “Passionate Learners – Giving Our Classrooms Back to Our Students” can be purchased now from Powerful Learning Press.   Second book“Empowered Schools, Empowered Students – Creating Connected and Invested Learners” can be pre-ordered from Corwin Press now.  Follow me on Twitter @PernilleRipp.

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5 thoughts on “My Kidblog Settings for Optimal Global Collaboration

  1. Pingback: Common Concerns With Student Blogging Answered | Blogging Through the Fourth Dimension

  2. Pingback: BREAK THE BARRIERS – USE SOCIAL MEDIA AS A LEARNING TOOL! PART1–CLASSROOM BLOGS | Aysin Alp's Blog

  3. I’ve used kidblog in the past and found it to be super easy. I also want to combine it with some sort of digital portfolio. Do your students keep one? Which platform do you use?

  4. Hi Pernille – I have been revisiting this post for a few months now. You have been my inspiration for taking the dive into student blogging. I have been tentative in the past, and your suggestions have helped me immensely. My students are LOVING it. Thank you for sharing your experience and passion.
    Best,
    Lisa
    https://kidblog.org/class/ms-lisas-class75/posts

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