Great Middle Grade Books to Give As Gifts

Oh the middle grade book, one of my favorite categories of books because of the diversity there it be had.  No wonder, this continues to be the most participated in category for the Global Read Aloud.  This year brought amazing books to share with students or to read quietly.  No wonder, there are so many of them I would love to give as gifts.

The Thing About Jellyfish by Ali Benjamin has shown up on many end of year best lists and there is a reason for that.  With Suzy’s tale of how to survive after an unexpected death, this is a must read for many people.

From Amazon:

After her best friend dies in a drowning accident, Suzy is convinced that the true cause of the tragedy must have been a rare jellyfish sting-things don’t just happen for no reason. Retreating into a silent world of imagination, she crafts a plan to prove her theory–even if it means traveling the globe, alone. Suzy’s achingly heartfelt journey explores life, death, the astonishing wonder of the universe…and the potential for love and hope right next door.

The graphic novel is a powerful one as evidenced by several of the suggestions on this list.  Roller Girl by Victoria Jamieson continues the tradition of creating relatable stories with powerful characters.  I disagree with Amazon, this books is not just for 10 year old girls.

From Amazon:

For most of her twelve years, Astrid has done everything with her best friend Nicole. But after Astrid falls in love with roller derby and signs up for derby camp, Nicole decides to go to dance camp instead. And so begins the most difficult summer of Astrid’s life as she struggles to keep up with the older girls at camp, hang on to the friend she feels slipping away, and cautiously embark on a new friendship. As the end of summer nears and her first roller derby bout (and junior high!) draws closer, Astrid realizes that maybe she is strong enough to handle the bout, a lost friendship, and middle school… in short, strong enough to be a roller girl.

Another graphic novel for the list; Sunny Side Up by Jennifer L. Holm and Matthew Holm.  This is the graphic novel of the year in my eyes since it gave us teachers a way to start hard conversations in our classrooms about addiction and a family in crisis.   Don’t let the format deceive you; this is powerful reading.

From Amazon:

Sunny Lewin has been packed off to Florida to live with her grandfather for the summer.  At first she thought Florida might be fun — it is  the home of Disney World, after all.  But the place where Gramps lives is no amusement park.  It’s full of . . . old people.  Really old people.
 
Luckily, Sunny isn’t the only kid around.  She meets Buzz, a boy who is completely obsessed with comic books, and soon they’re having adventures of their own: facing off against golfball-eating alligators, runaway cats, and mysteriously disappearing neighbors.  But the question remains — why is Sunny down in Florida in the first place?  The answer lies in a family secret that won’t be secret to Sunny much longer. . .

I never loved the original babysitters club, I was always drawn to much darker books when I was young, but I love the graphic novel versions of them.  Raina Telgemeier’s re-imagination of Ann M. Martin are fantastic for any child that loves graphic novels.  And again, this is not “just” a girl book.

From Amazon:

Kristy, Mary Anne, Claudia, and Stacey are best friends and founding members of The Baby-sitters Club. Whatever comes up — cranky toddlers, huge dogs, scary neighbors, prank calls — you can count on them to save the day. Baby-sitting isn’t always easy, and neither is dealing with strict parents, new families, fashion emergencies, and mysterious secrets. But no matter what, the BSC have what they need most: friendship.

Any fantasy lover, young or old, should read the amazing Circus Mirandus by debut author Cassie Beasley.  It is is whimsical, magical, and deep.  The best combination of book in my opinion.

From Amazon:

Do you believe in magic?
Micah Tuttle does.

Even though his awful Great-Aunt Gertrudis doesn’t approve, Micah believes in the stories his dying Grandpa Ephraim tells him of the magical Circus Mirandus: the invisible tiger guarding the gates, the beautiful flying birdwoman, and the magician more powerful than any other—the Man Who Bends Light. Finally, Grandpa Ephraim offers proof. The Circus is real. And the Lightbender owes Ephraim a miracle. With his friend Jenny Mendoza in tow, Micah sets out to find the Circus and the man he believes will save his grandfather.

The only problem is, the Lightbender doesn’t want to keep his promise. And now it’s up to Micah to get the miracle he came for.

Pam Munoz Ryan does not need to prove her master storyteller status and yet she keeps writing books that do just that.  Echo is an incredible book  that can be loved by mangy ages.

From Amazon:

Lost and alone in a forbidden forest, Otto meets three mysterious sisters and suddenly finds himself entwined in a puzzling quest involving a prophecy, a promise, and a harmonica.
 
Decades later, Friedrich in Germany, Mike in Pennsylvania, and Ivy in California each, in turn, become interwoven when the very same harmonica lands in their lives. All the children face daunting challenges: rescuing a father, protecting a brother, holding a family together. And ultimately, pulled by the invisible thread of destiny, their suspenseful solo stories converge in an orchestral crescendo. 

It is cause for celebration whenever Katherine Applegate releases a new book and Crenshaw is, indeed, a wonder.  If you had told me that I would fall in love with a story that centered around poverty and an imaginary cat, I am not sure I would have believed you.

From Amazon:

Jackson and his family have fallen on hard times. There’s no more money for rent. And not much for food, either. His parents, his little sister, and their dog may have to live in their minivan. Again.

Crenshaw is a cat. He’s large, he’s outspoken, and he’s imaginary. He has come back into Jackson’s life to help him. But is an imaginary friend enough to save this family from losing everything?

 

This list would be incomplete without Fish In A Tree  by the talented Lynda Mullaly Hunt.  This book, which was an official Global Read Aloud choice for this year, is one that is guaranteed to start conversations and have readers connect with it.  I have loved it with my 7th graders but have heard children ages 8 and up loving it.

From Amazon:

Ally has been smart enough to fool a lot of smart people. Every time she lands in a new school, she is able to hide her inability to read by creating clever yet disruptive distractions.  She is afraid to ask for help; after all, how can you cure dumb? However, her newest teacher Mr. Daniels sees the bright, creative kid underneath the trouble maker. With his help, Ally learns not to be so hard on herself and that dyslexia is nothing to be ashamed of. As her confidence grows, Ally feels free to be herself and the world starts opening up with possibilities. She discovers that there’s a lot more to her—and to everyone—than a label, and that great minds don’t always think alike.

I would never have guessed that Ada with her club foot would stay in my heart as long as she had, but the book The War that Saved My Life by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley is one that remains with you long after it has been read.

From Amazon:

Nine-year-old Ada has never left her one-room apartment. Her mother is too humiliated by Ada’s twisted foot to let her outside. So when her little brother Jamie is shipped out of London to escape the war, Ada doesn’t waste a minute—she sneaks out to join him.
 
So begins a new adventure of Ada, and for Susan Smith, the woman who is forced to take the two kids in. As Ada teaches herself to ride a pony, learns to read, and watches for German spies, she begins to trust Susan—and Susan begins to love Ada and Jamie. But in the end, will their bond be enough to hold them together through wartime? Or will Ada and her brother fall back into the cruel hands of their mother?

Jennifer A. Nielsen is another author that I will buy and read all of her books, sight unseen.  She consistently deliver high interest well written pieces that kids of many ages will love.  Her latest book, A Night Divided, is no exception.

From Amazon:

With the rise of the Berlin Wall, twelve-year-old Gerta finds her family suddenly divided. She, her mother, and her brother Fritz live on the eastern side, controlled by the Soviets. Her father and middle brother, who had gone west in search of work, cannot return home. Gerta knows it is dangerous to watch the wall, to think forbidden thoughts of freedom, yet she can’t help herself. She sees the East German soldiers with their guns trained on their own citizens; she, her family, her neighbors and friends are prisoners in their own city.

But one day, while on her way to school, Gerta spots her father on a viewing platform on the western side, pantomiming a peculiar dance. Then, when she receives a mysterious drawing, Gerta puts two and two together and concludes that her father wants Gerta and Fritz to tunnel beneath the wall, out of East Berlin. However, if they are caught, the consequences will be deadly. No one can be trusted. Will Gerta and her family find their way to freedom?

Creepy, crawly, and oh so good, The Nest by Kenneth Oppel is a book that I book-talked only to have it checked out of my classroom library since then.  Not a week goes by where a students does not ask where this book is.

From Amazon:

Steve just wants to save his baby brother—but what will he lose in the bargain? Kenneth Oppel’s (Silverwing, The Boundless) haunting gothic tale for fans of Coraline, is one of the most acclaimed books of the year, receiving six starred reviews. Illustrations from Caldecott Medalist Jon Klassen.

For some kids summer is a sun-soaked season of fun. But for Steve, it’s just another season of worries. Worries about his sick newborn baby brother who is fighting to survive, worries about his parents who are struggling to cope, even worries about the wasp’s nest looming ominously from the eaves. So when a mysterious wasp queen invades his dreams, offering to “fix” the baby, Steve thinks his prayers have been answered.

All he has to do is say “Yes.” But “yes” is a powerful word. It is also a dangerous one. And once it is uttered, can it be taken back?

Ooh’s and aah’s erupted when I book-talked The Marvels by Brian Selznick to my 7th graders.  He doesn’t need much introduction beside a reminder of what else he has written.  The students already know that his book will be worth their time, and I agree.

From Amazon:

The journey begins on a ship at sea in 1766, with a boy named Billy Marvel. After surviving a shipwreck, he finds work in a London theatre. There, his family flourishes for generations as brilliant actors until 1900, when young Leontes Marvel is banished from the stage.
 
Nearly a century later, Joseph Jervis runs away from school and seeks refuge with an uncle in London. Albert Nightingale’s strange, beautiful house, with its mysterious portraits and ghostly presences, captivates Joseph and leads him on a search for clues about the house, his family, and the past.

For fantasy fans comes this great new series with the first book Blackthorn Key by Kevin Sands.  My only complaint is only that I have to wait for the sequel.

From Amazon:

“Tell no one what I’ve given you.”

Until he got that cryptic warning, Christopher Rowe was happy, learning how to solve complex codes and puzzles and creating powerful medicines, potions, and weapons as an apprentice to Master Benedict Blackthorn—with maybe an explosion or two along the way.

But when a mysterious cult begins to prey on London’s apothecaries, the trail of murders grows closer and closer to Blackthorn’s shop. With time running out, Christopher must use every skill he’s learned to discover the key to a terrible secret with the power to tear the world apart.

For those who like a magical mystery, the Jackaby series by William Ritter is sure to hit the spot.  The first two books have been great and I cannot wait to see where the crazed, yet amazing, Jackaby takes on next.

From Amazon:

Newly arrived in New Fiddleham, New England, 1892, and in need of a job, Abigail Rook meets R. F. Jackaby, an investigator of the unexplained with a keen eye for the extraordinary–including the ability to see supernatural beings. Abigail has a gift for noticing ordinary but important details, which makes her perfect for the position of Jackaby’s assistant. On her first day, Abigail finds herself in the midst of a thrilling case: A serial killer is on the loose. The police are convinced it’s an ordinary villain, but Jackaby is certain the foul deeds are the work of the kind of creature whose very existence the local authorities–with the exception of a handsome young detective named Charlie Cane–seem adamant to deny.

This is the book I handed to a reader who had yet to finish a book this year.  This is the book that made that reader want to read just one more page.  This is the book I need more copies of because we all have those readers that do not want to read.  House Arrest by K.A. Holt is a must read.

From Amazon:

Timothy is on probation. It’s a strange word—something that happens to other kids, to delinquents, not to kids like him. And yet, he is under house arrest for the next year. He must check in weekly with a probation officer and a therapist, and keep a journal for an entire year. And mostly, he has to stay out of trouble. But when he must take drastic measures to help his struggling family, staying out of trouble proves more difficult than Timothy ever thought it would be. By turns touching and funny, and always original, House Arrest is a middlegrade novel in verse about one boy’s path to redemption as he navigates life with a sick brother, a grieving mother, and one tough probation officer.

5 thoughts on “Great Middle Grade Books to Give As Gifts

  1. Pingback: Great Middle Grade Books to Give As Gifts | Mid...

  2. Pingback: Give the Gift of a Book: Ideas for Children | BLOGCEA

  3. Pingback: The Books I Am Giving As Gifts |

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