Why You Should be Voxing

image from icanread

I am not one to post much about new tech tools, after all, I don’t use a lot, which I know may be a surprise to many.  I tend to find a few that I really, really like and then use them to death, telling everyone to use it and then helping everyone do it.  I don’t review a lot of tech tools on here because that is not what this blog is about.  In fact, I can’t even remember the last time I wrote a post about anything new.  But it is time to introduce the world to something new, that may just make your whole summer; Voxer.

What is Voxer?  It’s a free walkie-talkie app.  Now, you may think, like I did, why would I want  a walkie talkie app on my phone?  The first time I was told about it by my friend Leah Whitford, I didn’t get it.  Then I forgot about it.  Then the Bammys finalists announcement happened, and another friend urged me to join the conversation happening on Voxer.  So I did, and I have loved it ever since.

First of all, Voxer adds another layer to my connections.  I can now hear someone’s voice on my own time (the audio messages are archived for whenever you want to play them) and that matters to me.  I can tell a lot simply by a tone or a quick comment.  Much easier than texting, much more meaningful than a direct message on Twitter.

Second, Voxer lets you add as many people as you want to a conversation.  I am a part of a few different groups that started out discussing one thing, but have since branched out into other topics.  I have loved seeing where these conversations have headed and also the new people that have joined that I did not know before.  (Don’t worry, you have to invite people to the conversation).

Third, I can reach out so easily now.  I have reached out to several of my friends and fellow connected educators with everything from a quick hello to asking for a favor.  I have also been sent messages from people I have never spoken to or met but that I have connected with through Twitter.  You decide whether people can find you or not, I like that I am findable though so I can expand my connections.

Fourth, it is making my commute awesome.  Because the audio and text messages are archived within the conversations chronologically, I can catch up whenever I want.  All I have to do is hit play and listen.

And finally, for all of the other reasons that I left out and a much better explanation of how to use it, please see Joe Mazza’s post on Voxer and how he uses it.  And a Google Doc where people have shared their Voxer names and info.

I am a passionate (female) 7th grade teacher in Wisconsin, USA, proud techy geek, and mass consumer of incredible books. Creator of the Global Read Aloud Project, Co-founder of EdCamp MadWI, and believer in all children. I have no awards or accolades except for the lightbulbs that go off in my students’ heads every day.  First book “Passionate Learners – Giving Our Classrooms Back to Our Students” can be purchased now from Powerful Learning Press.   Second book“Empowered Schools, Empowered Students – Creating Connected and Invested Learners” can be pre-ordered from Corwin Press now.  Follow me on Twitter @PernilleRipp.

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